Category 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY'

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Trust Barometer 2018: The Battle for Truth

EVENTS, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
trust summit 2018

Trust Summit 2018 28 March 2018, 14:00-18:00 | Brussels Presented by Edelman Brussels and the Public Affairs Council, with special thanks to our summit partners Pfizer and EY. Please register now to ensure attendance. Building...

trust summit 2018

Trust Summit 2018

28 March 2018, 14:00-18:00 | Brussels

Presented by Edelman Brussels and the Public Affairs Council, with special thanks to our summit partners Pfizer and EY. Please register now to ensure attendance.

Building on the success of last year’s European Trust Summit, the 2018 edition will take place on 28 March.

Co-presented by the Public Affairs Council and Edelman, we expect to attract over 100 mid- to senior-level government officials and public affairs professionals.

The publication of the Edelman 2018 Trust Barometer, along with major changes in social, regulatory and business trends have made this senior-level discussion a must-attend event for crafting your corporate or association strategy for 2018.

Pricing

  • PAC Members: €50
  • Non-Members: €95

Prices exclude VAT @ 21%, includes light refreshments, handouts, and an evening reception.

Get your tickets here.


Speakers include

Register now.


Event Location

Thon Hotel EU
Rue de la Loi 75
B-1040
Brussels


Agenda

13:30-14:00 Arrival/Check-in

14:00-14:20 Keynote speech

14:20-14:25 Why trust matters for corporate governance

14:25-14:50 Trust Barometer Findings

14:50-15:50 Panel I:

  • The issues businesses face in building trust with consumers
  • The role NGOs play in influencing their policy agendas
  • The reasons for and consequences of increased trust in employers

15:50-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:15 Panel 2:

  • Media, platforms and spokespeople, and the actions media and regulators can take in this complex environment.

17:15-18:00 Closing remarks

18:00 Reception

EDELMAN TRUST BAROMETER 2017: TRUST IN CRISIS

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, TRENDS & INSIGHT
EDELMAN TRUST BAROMETER 2017

The 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals the largest-ever drop in trust across the institutions of government, business, media and NGOs. Trust in media (43 percent) fell precipitously and is at all-time lows in 17 countries,...

The 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals the largest-ever drop in trust across the institutions of government, business, media and NGOs. Trust in media (43 percent) fell precipitously and is at all-time lows in 17 countries, while trust levels in government (41 percent) dropped in 14 markets and is the least trusted institution in half of the 28 countries surveyed. The credibility of leaders also is in peril: CEO credibility dropped 12 points globally to an all-time low of 37 percent, plummeting in every country studied, while government leaders (29 percent) remain least credible.

The Trust Barometer found that 53 percent of respondents believe the current overall system has failed them—it is unfair and offers little hope for the future—while only 15 percent believe it is working, and approximately one-third are uncertain. Even the elites have a lack of faith in the system, with 48 percent of the top quartile in income, 49 percent of the college-educated and a majority of the well-informed (51 percent) saying the system has failed.

The gap between the trust held by the informed public and that of the mass population has widened to 15 points, with the biggest disparities in the U.S. (21points), U.K. (19 points) and France (18 points). The mass population in 20 countries distrusts their institutions, compared to only six for the informed public.

“The implications of the global trust crisis are deep and wide-ranging,” said Richard Edelman, president and CEO of Edelman. “It began with the Great Recession of 2008, but like the second and third waves of a tsunami, globalization and technological change have further weakened people’s trust in global institutions. The consequence is virulent populism and nationalism as the mass population has taken control away from the elites.”

Current populist movements are fueled by a lack of trust in the system and economic and societal fears, including corruption (40 percent), immigration (28 percent), globalization (27 percent), eroding social values (25 percent) and the pace of innovation (22 percent). Countries coupling a lack of faith in the system with deep fears, such as the U.S., U.K. and Italy have seen the election of Donald Trump, the Brexit vote and the failed Italian referendum.

The cycle of distrust is magnified by the emergence of a media echo chamber that reinforces personal beliefs while shutting out opposing points of view. Respondents favor search engines (59 percent) over human editors (41 percent) and are nearly four times more likely to ignore information that supports a position they do not believe in.

“People now view media as part of the elite,” said Edelman. “The result is a proclivity for self-referential media and reliance on peers. The lack of trust in media has also given rise to the fake news phenomenon and politicians speaking directly to the masses. Media outlets must take a more local and social approach.”

There is evidence of even further dispersion of authority. A person like yourself (60 percent) is now just as credible a source of information about a company as is a technical (60 percent) or academic (60 percent) expert, and far more credible than a CEO (37 percent) and government official (29 percent).

Of the four institutions, business is viewed as the only one that can make a difference. Three out of four respondents agree a company can take actions to both increase profits and improve economic and social conditions in the community where it operates. Moreover, among those who are uncertain about whether the system is working for them, it is business (58 percent) that they trust most.

Yet business finds itself on the brink of distrust, and perhaps most concerning for business is the perceived role the public sees it playing in stoking their fears. A majority of the global population surveyed worries about losing their jobs due to the impacts of globalization (60 percent), lack of training or skills (60 percent), immigrants who work for less (58 percent), jobs moving to cheaper markets (55 percent) and automation (54 percent).

“After the challenges of 2016, 2017 has the potential to be a whole lot worse,” said Gurpreet Brar, General Manager for the Edelman Brussels office. “Across the continent we are seeing challenges materialise for the key pillars of society – politicians, business leaders, NGOS and the media – as the belief in the current system falters and a loss of trust in institutions becomes mainstream.”

“With this backdrop we have to ask ourselves, if we actually want to preserve these institutions, what we should do: the answers will be complex, but one simple conclusion is that a top-down solution will not do.”

Other key findings from the 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer include:

• Trust in business (52 percent) dropped in 18 countries, while NGOs (53 percent) saw drop-offs as high as 10 points across 21 countries.

• Employees, on average, are trusted 16 points more than CEOs on messaging around employee/customer relations (53 percent), financial earnings (38 percent), crises (37 percent), innovation (33 percent), industry issues (32 percent) or programs addressing societal issues (30 percent).

• Half of the countries surveyed have lost faith in the system, led by France (72 percent) and Italy (72 percent), Mexico (67 percent), South Africa (67 percent) and Spain (67 percent).

• Trust in traditional media fell 5 points to 57 percent, the steepest decline among platforms since 2012, followed by social media (41 percent), which dropped 3 points. By contrast, online-only media (51 percent) received the biggest bump in trust at 5 points.

Read the full report here:
2017-trust-barometer_eu-countries_april-2017

EDELMAN LAUNCHES EDELMAN EDGE, A NEW GLOBAL CAMPAIGNING METHODOLOGY

GENERAL, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, PUBLIC AFFAIRS, TRENDS & INSIGHT

Edelman has launched Edelman Edge, the first global campaigning methodology designed to provide a comprehensive, objective analysis of the communications environment anywhere in the world. Edelman Edge provides a science-based framework to easily adapt multi-market...


Edelman
has launched Edelman Edge, the first global campaigning methodology designed to provide a comprehensive, objective analysis of the communications environment anywhere in the world.

Edelman Edge provides a science-based framework to easily adapt multi-market campaigns to local market conditions. Using a proprietary market research model, Edelman Edge helps companies and governments to understand and better leverage the key drivers that shape issue-centric campaigning based on a consistent analysis of the structural and environmental factors as well as the latest social science.

Stephanie Lvovich, global chair of public affairs at Edelman, said “Public affairs and issue campaigning are in the middle of an important revolution, and at Edelman we are seeking to lead innovation in global issue campaigning. As a discipline, public affairs was built on local expertise and knowledge, and these continue to be important factors in success today. However, as clients’ global footprints have expanded, they often don’t have the expertise or communications staff on the ground where they operate. Today, issues spread across borders so quickly creating an additional need for a framework through which to manage the same issue across multiple geographies”.

The Edelman Edge model analyses 25 political, economic, social and cultural drivers that determine the campaigning and stakeholder engagement environments in a market. It provides a digestible roadmap for senior public affairs practitioners who need to understand the diverse, multi-market/multi-regional landscape that they manage. Edelman Edge helps companies understand not only the key communications and advocacy attributes of each market, but also provides a science-based, consistent explanation of WHY the market’s campaigning environment is the way it is.

Edelman Edge captures the subtle but very important nuances among markets, and accurately paints a picture of the stakeholder environment anywhere in the world. This understanding then forms the basis of Edge country and regional reports that inform how a global strategy or communications campaign can be nuanced and tailored to suit a wide variety of market contexts.

“We created Edelman Edge to provide an additional layer of insights to inform campaign strategy – it is a completely unique prism through which to understand the communications and advocacy environment around the world. The Edge gives clients clear and actionable guidance on how to effectively localise global campaigns and identify synergies in execution through a more intelligent hub and spokes model,” Lvovich said. “It is particularly relevant for clients who have a global, regional or multi-geography role or are managing issues across borders.”

Edelman Edge country reports and other materials will be hosted on an online platform and available to download on demand. For more information about the Edge, visit edge.edelman.com.

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