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Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2017: An Overview

EU AFFAIRS
Mulitannual Financial Framework

Our last briefing note broke down the top down political implications of the proposed Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF). This one dives deep into how the budget is divided, what the timeline is for its passing...

Our last briefing note broke down the top down political implications of the proposed Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF). This one dives deep into how the budget is divided, what the timeline is for its passing and what the reactions have been so far.

The European Commission released on the 2nd of May 2018 its proposal for the next MFF. which will cover the years 2021 to 2027. The MFF sets the budget of the European Union for the next seven years and determines how it will be allocated to its various programmes. As such, the MFF reaffirms the EU’s political priorities and defines how they will be achieved. Much awaited due to the impending Brexit, the proposal can be perceived as a bold move by the Commission, seeking to increase the EU budget and investing in new priorities such as defence or digital transformation, while cutting funds in flagship programmes.

Despite the sizeable gap created by Brexit, the European Commission proposes to set the EU budget up to €1.279 trillion, which accounts for 1.11% of the EU27’s gross national income. This ambitious amount is well-aligned with the Commission’s motto for this MFF – ‘doing more with less’ – and aims to face two main challenges: dealing with the financial consequences of the UK’s withdrawal, and providing additional resources to tackle the EU’s new priorities.

Read the full briefing here

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Interested in tracking the European debate and gaining insight how it may impact you and your business?

Contact Edelman Brussels to learn more.

2021-2027 EU budget

Gurpreet Brar, General Manager, Brussels

2021-2027 EU budget

Federica Boledi, PA Practices, Brussels

Between The Numbers

GENERAL
2021-2027 EU budget

The EU has so far managed to avoid answering some of the fundamental questions that have been troubling the block for years: How will Brexit affect the remaining countries? Whose responsibility is the migration crisis...

The EU has so far managed to avoid answering some of the fundamental questions that have been troubling the block for years: How will Brexit affect the remaining countries? Whose responsibility is the migration crisis and how can Member States better tackle terrorism? Can Member States refuse to abide to European values (e.g. the principle of solidarity in the refugee crisis) and still benefit from the EU funds? … But the discussion on the new EU budget is bringing all the chickens home to roost and will force the EU and its Member States to find a middle ground on many of these thorny issues.

On 2 May, the EU published the proposal for the next seven-year budget, which covers the amount of money the organisation will be able to spend, invest and award to players and projects in the EU for the period 2021-2027. Though it may seem boring and uneventful on the surface, the adoption of the EU budget will be the one thing that will force Member States to discuss and hopefully agree on a shared vision for the future of the EU.

To start, this will be the first budget to be agreed without the UK, and Member States will have to increase contributions to the EU in order to cover at least part of the estimated annual €12 billion gap created by the UK’s departure. It remains to be seen whether the proposed €1,279 billion budget, an increase of 15% over the previous period, will be agreed, as detractors complain that a Union of 27 shouldn’t be more expensive than one including 28 Member States.

The increased budget, however, is justified by many by the increased number of priorities of the EU, including security and migration. While the proposal foresees significant cuts to major programs dedicated to the agricultural sector (-5%) and regional development (-7%) – two areas that have been the cornerstone of EU spending since the early days – it introduces new priorities such as defence (€13 billion) and digital transformation (up to €9.5 billion). Winners of this proposal are, without doubt, the research and innovation fund, which received a 30% increase compared to the previous budget, and border control, migration and asylum policies which saw their allocation more than doubled in this proposal…

Read the rest of the briefing here

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Interested in tracking the European debate and gaining insight how it may impact you and your business?

Contact Edelman Brussels to learn more.

2021-2027 EU budget

Gurpreet Brar, General Manager, Brussels

2021-2027 EU budget

Federica Boledi, PA Practices, Brussels

Trust Barometer 2018: The Battle for Truth

EVENTS, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
trust summit 2018

Trust Summit 2018 28 March 2018, 14:00-18:00 | Brussels Presented by Edelman Brussels and the Public Affairs Council, with special thanks to our summit partners Pfizer and EY. Please register now to ensure attendance. Building...

trust summit 2018

Trust Summit 2018

28 March 2018, 14:00-18:00 | Brussels

Presented by Edelman Brussels and the Public Affairs Council, with special thanks to our summit partners Pfizer and EY. Please register now to ensure attendance.

Building on the success of last year’s European Trust Summit, the 2018 edition will take place on 28 March.

Co-presented by the Public Affairs Council and Edelman, we expect to attract over 100 mid- to senior-level government officials and public affairs professionals.

The publication of the Edelman 2018 Trust Barometer, along with major changes in social, regulatory and business trends have made this senior-level discussion a must-attend event for crafting your corporate or association strategy for 2018.

Pricing

  • PAC Members: €50
  • Non-Members: €95

Prices exclude VAT @ 21%, includes light refreshments, handouts, and an evening reception.

Get your tickets here.


Speakers include

Register now.


Event Location

Thon Hotel EU
Rue de la Loi 75
B-1040
Brussels


Agenda

13:30-14:00 Arrival/Check-in

14:00-14:20 Keynote speech

14:20-14:25 Why trust matters for corporate governance

14:25-14:50 Trust Barometer Findings

14:50-15:50 Panel I:

  • The issues businesses face in building trust with consumers
  • The role NGOs play in influencing their policy agendas
  • The reasons for and consequences of increased trust in employers

15:50-16:15 Coffee Break

16:15-17:15 Panel 2:

  • Media, platforms and spokespeople, and the actions media and regulators can take in this complex environment.

17:15-18:00 Closing remarks

18:00 Reception

The EU Response to the Paradise Papers

NEWS, PUBLIC AFFAIRS
paradise papers

“Now is the time to look ahead, at the future of taxation, for a competitive and fairer Europe”. This statement from Pierre Moscovici, the EU’s top taxation official, comes after a succession of tax evasions...

“Now is the time to look ahead, at the future of taxation, for a competitive and fairer Europe”.

This statement from Pierre Moscovici, the EU’s top taxation official, comes after a succession of tax evasions scandals in recent years which have pushed the European Commission to adopt a strong position on the issue and focus its efforts on improving tax legislation and hunting down alleged tax-dodging companies and tax havens.

Contents

  • What are the Paradise Papers and why are they so important?
  • Overview of the Paradise Papers public hearing at the European Parliament
  • What is the EU doing and why does it matter?

Download the briefing here

Interested in tracking the European debate and gaining insight into how it may impact you and your business?

Contact Edelman Brusssels to learn more.

Australian Citizenship Status Undermining Turnball Government

GENERAL, GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

The Turnbull government is facing minority status and a difficult by-election after Australia’s High Court found the entire leadership of the National Party — Deputy PM Barnaby Joyce and Nationals deputy leader Fiona Nash —...

The Turnbull government is facing minority status and a difficult by-election after Australia’s High Court found the entire leadership of the National Party — Deputy PM Barnaby Joyce and Nationals deputy leader Fiona Nash — ineligible to stand at the 2016 election, due to their citizenship status under section 44 of the Australian constitution.

Mr Joyce will now face a by-election in the seat of New England, likely to be called on the 2 December, with a writ issued by the Speaker of the House today. Joyce is one of five federal MPs to be unanimously knocked out by the Court. It also found former Greens senators Scott Ludlam and Larissa Waters were not validly elected, along with One Nation’s controversial Senator Malcolm Roberts and the National Party’s Fiona Nash.  Nick Xenophon and Matt Canavan have been ruled eligible, though Nick Xenophon will leave Federal politics to pursue a career in State politics in his home state of South Australia.

In terms of the immediate fall out, Matt Canavan will return to Northern Australia and Resources Minister; Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will take on Agriculture and Water Resources, and Mitch Fifield will take on Regional Communications from Fiona Nash – Darren Chester will take on her other portfolios.

The issue of citizenship was raised in July this year following the resignation of Greens Senator Scott Ludlam who resigned from the Senate after it was brought to his attention he held dual Australian and New Zealand citizenship, rendering him ineligible to hold elected office in the Federal Parliament under section 44 of the Australian Constitution.

He became the first casualty of the 2017 Australian constitutional crisis. Ludlam’s resignation led to a number of MPs and Senators publicly clarifying their citizenship status, and also led to fellow Greens Senator and Deputy Leader Larissa Waters’s resignation four days later, after discovering she held Canadian citizenship.  A swathe of allegations regarding eligibility followed, which resulted in the establishment of the Citizenship Seven – referred to the High Court for assessment.

These rulings have plunged the government into disarray.  As a minority government, Turnbull’s slim grip on power will be tested in the result of the forthcoming New England by-election.   If the seat is not won by a Liberal or National candidate, the current government will cease to maintain its one seat majority, forcing a Federal election early next year.

Joyce’s dismissal also leaves open to challenge every ministerial decision he has made, as well as those made by Ms Nash, since October 20 last year.

Legal advice obtained by the ALP confirms that under section 64 of the constitution a person can only act as a minister for three months without being a member of Parliament. Mr Joyce is now invalid as an MP from the time of last year’s election on July 2, and the only decisions which are valid are those which he made in the first three months as minister after he was sworn in on July 19.

Ultimately, the impression that the Turnbull government is notable only for its chaos and instability has been reinforced.  If a Federal election is triggered by the result of the New England by-election, we could be facing yet another leadership change and an inevitable impact on business and consumer confidence.

Briefing note on the situation in Catalonia

NEWS, PUBLIC AFFAIRS
situation in Catalonia

The situation in Catalonia is complex.  For more than three decades the Regional Government of Catalonia (with a strong ruling and executive autonomy according to the Spanish Constitution) is trying to obtain further fiscal benefits...

The situation in Catalonia is complex.  For more than three decades the Regional Government of Catalonia (with a strong ruling and executive autonomy according to the Spanish Constitution) is trying to obtain further fiscal benefits from the Central Government. Negotiations on this front have had little success and for that and  for other historical demands over the last few years the Catalan government (Generalitat) has boosted its positioning claiming for an independence from Spain. To do so over the last couple of years the Catalan government has undertaken a campaign aiming at celebrating a referendum for Catalonia to decide its independence on October 1st.

This process is illegal as it does not respect the Spanish Constitution requirements nor the Catalan government’s current legislation. This situation has led to a strong mobilization by the Catalan government and a segment of Catalan citizens, students and supporters of independentists parties. From a civil society perspective this process is being opposed by the business community, most of the media, academia and intellectuals. The latter are mostly on the left ideology spectrum but strongly oppose the lack of democracy and respect of the law from the Catalan government in managing this so-called independence process.

From a legal perspective, though the Catalan government is keeping on saying publicly that the referendum will take place on October 1st, it will have no legal value at all in case it happens. We can expect ongoing street demonstrations in the next few days which will be echoed by the national and international media. The only way forward is that both, central and Catalan governments, engage in a political dialogue to set up the basis for a legal revision of Catalonia membership to Spain according to the Constitution and the full respect of the civil rights of all Catalonia citizens including the ones not in favour the independence process.

Another important part of the civil society supports ‘the right to decide’ and stands up for an open dialogue and the possibility of negotiating a future referendum with guarantees within the legal framework.

Despite measures being taken by the Spanish justice system and the authorities to prevent a planned illegal referendum on Catalan independence from taking place on Sunday, the regional premier, Carles Puigdemont, was determined on Thursday night that the poll would go ahead.

Get the full briefing note here.

Subsequent notes

Summaries of the recent events and some decoders to understand this awkward political situation have been prepared by Edelman Spain

  1. Reactions to the referendum 
  2. Fallout from the referendum
  3. The declaration of independence

 

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